He’s like Marmite…

I know we are given completely free rein in choosing what we would like to write about on here (minus expletives or obscenities) so it may seem a little sad that I am going to share a pharmaceutical-related post, but I think that there is much more behind the scenes of this particular article. Last weekend I sacrificed my much-anticipated Saturday morning lie in to go and visit the Damien Hirst exhibition at the Paul Stopler gallery. Art teamed with science is pretty much my idea of heaven, especially when it displays such an analytical platform – there’s always Sunday.

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SCHIZOPHRENOGENESIS – yes I also wondered how Hirst managed to piece this term together, the melody of the syllables suddenly resonates a pleasant edge. After wandering around the life-size articles for the first 10 minutes I took it upon myself to ask an exhibitionist what they understood by that name in lights – it took a lot as it was a fairly small room with a deafening silence. So apparently Hirst wanted to try to portray the birth of schizophrenia through the way in which the pharmaceutical giants dress up their products. He feels as though it’s a two-way street in the development of such a disorder, and the prescription of medication – sort of a ‘chicken or egg’ dilemma.

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(Damien & Genesis’ Phil look separated at birth)

And as an unsuspecting member of the public it is easy to be drawn in by the pretty, clean and striking models that are laid out on such a stark white background. But what is missing is the dark side of which ironically Damien is notorious for, which is why I find this particular piece so tantalising. It’s not about the first impression, Hirst entices you into becoming infatuated by the portraits, the neon title and the pastel toy-like models, but what is really significant is the sobering reflection.

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The pharmaceutical aspect of this exhibition is actually – excuse the cliché – the tip of the iceberg. Hirst even took it upon himself to plaster his own brand over the back of a pill packet to almost make a mockery of the giants of the industry, to fool you to believe that anyone could personalise and materialise their very own fairytale cure.

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I’m sure many are aware of the imprisoning nature of Schizophrenia however little is known about the effects that it induces upon sufferers and their loved ones. They too strive to create a façade, to disguise the differing personalities and states of mind. Governed by the diagnosis from a trusted professional and ultimately held hostage by the tiny capsules that greet them each day. In a way it is a pretty pill, a beaming beacon of hope that helps guide an individual towards a lifestyle that is worthy of a show – but the show must go on and in this case spiral into a vicious circle. As an audience you are confronted by stacks of medication piled on top of one another, possibly signifying the competitive nature of the industry; which I interpret as a reflection of the competing thoughts that a sufferer has to strive to referee.

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Looking at the containers, the bottles and this syringe – they are all empty, why? It leaves you with such a hollow feeling, this outer shell portrays such a promise from a first glance, but the reality is lacking true substance. Interestingly I managed to discover that Hirst had toyed with the idea of including a completely transparent see-through pill model to bring the placebo to life, but I think the fact that he decided against this emphasises the very purpose. The placebo effect in this case is the one the audience feels viewing his spectacle.

Anyway, I could type on for pages analysing his every intension but I will leave you to take away what you will. From my perspective Hirst can do no wrong (mild bias) and work of this nature can only create a global platform for the education and positive press of a disorder like schizophrenia. If you do get the chance to visit, this free exhibition is on until the 15th November (Tuesday–Saturday). Unless you want to purchase a little memento, in which case all the best with selling your car.

Thanks for reading :-)

Abbie Warner – Junior Account Executive

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